Norman Rockwell Museum of Vermont -
Your #1 Source for Norman Rockwell Art, Prints, Figurines, Plates, Boy Scout Prints, Saturday Evening Post Covers, and More!
Holiday Treasures
click here
Norman Rockwell Museum of Vermont  Your #1 Source for Norman Rockwell Art, Prints, Norman Rockwell Figurines,  Plates, Boy Scout Prints, Saturday Evening Post Covers, and More! Norman Rockwell of Vermont - Saturday Evening Post Covers
 

The Rosie The Riveter Story

Painted for the cover of the May 29, 1943 edition of The Saturday Evening Post, Norman Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter gave visual form to this phenomenon and became an iconic image of American popular culture. Rockwell portrayed Rosie as a monumental figure clad in overalls and a work-shirt with the sleeves rolled up to reveal her powerful, muscular arms. Seated against the backdrop of a rippling American flag, she is shown pausing for lunch, with a riveting machine and a tin lunch box balanced on her substantial lap, her visor and goggles pushed back on her head and a ham sandwich clasped in her hand. Despite her massive bulk, sturdy work clothes and the smudges on her arms and cheeks, Rosie's painted fingernails, lipstick and the tidy arrangement of her bright red curls wittily convey her underlying femininity. Pausing between bites, she gazes into the distance with a detached air of supreme self-assurance, while casually crushing a tattered copy of Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf under her feet.

Rockwell found the model for Rosie in Mary Doyle (now Mary Keefe), a nineteen year old telephone operator in Arlington, Vermont. Mrs. Keefe recalls meeting Mary Rockwell, the artist's wife, when she came in to pay her telephone bill. Like many other residents of the small town, Mary eventually became acquainted with the artist and readily accepted when Rockwell called and asked her to pose. Mrs. Keefe remembers arriving at the studio, where Rockwell had assembled her costume, which originally included a white shirt and saddle shoes. She sat for several photographs (all of which were destroyed when Rockwell's studio burned to the ground during the summer of 1943), but had to return for a second session with the artist when he decided he wanted Rosie to be wearing a blue shirt and penny loafers. Mrs. Keefe saw the final composition for the first time during a trip to a newsstand in Bennington, Vermont, where she happened to see a poster advertising the May 29, 1943 edition of The Saturday Evening Post. She remembers being rather shocked by Rockwell's transformation of her slim figure into Rosie's overly muscular physique, but adds that the artist later called her to apologize for his exaggerated enlargement of her size.


Prints IPrints IIGiftsBoy ScoutsOriginal SEP CoversCollector Plates FigurinesMatted PrintsFramed Prints I
Mugs & MagsTender Tributes
PuzzlesEmbossed PrintsAfghans Four Freedoms Clothtiques Rockwell's Art
Robert Duncan Featured Artist Vermont LinksDirectionsShipping •  • Email Us Gift Certificates
Home Volume Sales 
ViewCart

 Norman Rockwell Museum of Vermont ~ 654 Route 4 East ~ Rutland, VT  05701
Toll-Free 1-877-773-6095

Copyright© 1999-2014 Norman Rockwell Museum of Vermont. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction without Permission is Prohibited.
Custom E-Commerce Website Design and Web Hosting by www.ktwebdesigns.com